Turn to the Lord

 So then, remember that at one time you Gentiles by birth,[a] called “the uncircumcision” by those who are called “the circumcision”—a physical circumcision made in the flesh by human hands—  remember that you were at that time without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world.  But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ.  For he is our peace; in his flesh he has made both groups into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us.  He has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace,  and might reconcile both groups to God in one body[b] through the cross, thus putting to death that hostility through it.[c]  So he came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near;  for through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father.  So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God,  built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the cornerstone.[d]  In him the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord;  in whom you also are built together spiritually[e] into a dwelling place for God. – Ephesians 2:11-22

Now as Peter went here and there among all the believers, he came down also to the saints living in Lydda.  There he found a man named Aeneas, who had been bedridden for eight years, for he was paralyzed.  Peter said to him, “Aeneas, Jesus Christ heals you; get up and make your bed!” And immediately he got up. And all the residents of Lydda and Sharon saw him and turned to the Lord. – Acts 9:32-35

Turn to Jesus – Hermann Kim

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On the third day He will be raised

Historical writings show that Christians met regularly on Sunday, the first day of the week, because it had been the day upon which Jesus had risen.

One in particular caught my attention recently —

107 AD “Be not deceived with strange doctrines, nor with old fables, which are unprofitable. For if we still live according to the Jewish law, we acknowledge that we have not received grace… If, therefore, those who were brought up in the ancient order of things have come to the possession of a new hope, no longer observing the Sabbath, but living in the observance of the Lord’s Day, on which also our life has sprung up again by Him and by His death (which some deny), through which mystery we received faith, and on account of which we suffer in order that we may be found disciples of Jesus Christ our only teacher, how shall we be able to live apart from him for whom even the prophets were looking as their teacher since they were his disciples in the spirit?… let every friend of Christ keep the Lord’s Day as a festival, the resurrection-day, the queen and chief of all the days of the week” (Ignatius, Epistle to the Magnesians, chp 9. Ante-Nicene Fathers 1:62-63).

Those who choose to keep the law are not partakers of the grace and truth brought by Jesus Christ. They have no hope in the seventh day.

For our hope is that we too will raise from the dead and experience the power of the resurrection having our mortal bodies transformed into ones that are incorruptible.

 Resurrection and ascension ratified the efficacy of God’s covenant of salvation and displayed God’s immense sovereignty and ensures the hope of believers.

“See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death;  then they will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified; and on the third day he will be raised.” – Matthew 20:18-19